MP Foxtrotters - Gaited Horses for Pleasure or Ranch
FOR UPDATES and Membership -please scroll down to middle of page

SHORT HISTORY OF THE MISSOURI FOX TROTTER

What is a Narragansett Pacer???
 
Historically, all gaited horses in the US trace back to the now extinct Narragansett  pacer, named as such after the area they first set foot on this country in Rhode Island on the Narragansett Bay, a popular port for incoming European settlers and their prized horses. The origins to the breed can be traced to the early 18 century (1700’s) and is considered the first American breed of horse. They were established from Spanish and English horses. The Spanish Jennet , Irish Hobby, and Galloway ponies (also extinct) of Scotland are frequently mentioned as a probable early source. The Narragansett became a well established breed in our early history and used for riding and for horse races allowed in Rhode Island (forbidden elsewhere) and for use by most government officials such as George Washington due to their smooth ambling gait. Later massive exporting to the Caribbean and many cross outs of the remaining horses led the purest form of the breed into extinction as the last recorded pacer died around 1880. However, gaited breeds in America today can trace their heritage to the Narragansett Pacer. They were crossed with Morgans, Thoroughbreds, and Arabians, and created new breeds such as the Standardbreds, American Saddlebreds, Tennessee Walking Horse, Missouri Fox Trotters, and distantly related Rocky Mountain Ponies. All these gaited breeds can claim heritage in the first American breed, the Narragansett pacer.

The All American Horse

In between the gaited horses we know today and the Narragansett Pacer was a typified gaited breed closely related to the Narragansett Pacer but crossed with the Thoroughbred,  Morgans, and Arabians….this horse was simply called the ”American Horse” The American Horse migrated east with the early settlers as they came into Kentucky, Missouri, and Tennessee. They brought along with them several breeds of horses such as the draft horse, the race horse, and the American Horse as their all purpose using horse with easy riding gaits. Slowly over time and with slight variances these horses evolved into the gaited horse breeds we know today. Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri and other states modified this breed into their own specific gaited riding horse, developing unique styles. In Missouri, the Ozark mountains required a sure footed horse and the “All American Horse” was bred to preserve and promote the foxtrot and to create an all purpose ranch and riding horse later called the Missouri Fox Trotter. The fox trot was ideal for the sure-footed, ground covering gait needed in the rugged Ozarks.

The Gaited Breeds
Of course all horses have gaits but what do we mean by the "gaited breeds"??? Horses are considered gaited if they can perform intermediate gaits to the basic walk, trot, and canter. These intermediate gaits are genetically based and involve a tendency to place the feet in a manner that is slightly staggered or changed from the standard three gaits. Often the footfall pattern creates a very comfortable and steady gait that can be maintained for long periods of time: the fox trot is one such gait. Some horses can be trained to do an intermediate gait that does not come natural and it may takes many hours of training to acheive. We are breeding for the natural gait that the horse can be seen doing out in the pasture before training. With the foundation genetics of the fox trotter they should perform naturally. Training to cues is needed but not training to gait.

  In summary: when the Narragansett Pacer became extinct in its’ purest form it left behind a large influence through cross-outs which became known as the All American Horse:


THE ALL AMERICAN HORSES  became:

---------in Kentucky: The American Saddle Horse (later known as the Saddlebred)            

--------in Tennessee: The Tennessee Walking Horse-

---------in Missouri: The Missouri Fox Trotter- 1948 registry formed

All these horses as descendants of the Narragansett ambling horse are genetically predispositioned to intermediate gaits. Some horses focus on the more lateral gaits (where the legs on the same side move together, i.e. pace) and some gaited horse breedings focus on the diagonal gait (opposite front and back legs move together, i.e. trot)and other gaits are what are called square where all feet are measured onto the round equally, i.e. walk, flat foot walk, running walk)

You may ask just what is the fox trot?

The difference between a fox trot and a regular trot:

 In a standard two beat trot the horse hops from two diagonal legs to the other…creating a jolt that is hard on the horse and rider…in the Missouri Fox Trotter this same trot is slightly changed so that the foot fall is slightly out of sync creating a situation where there is always contact with the ground. The fox trot is often described as walking with the front and trotting with the hind feet.  A familiar sound pattern to describe the rhythm is” A chunk of meat and two potatoes”, which can be said to the rhythm of the fox trot.  Fox Trotters are judged for their flat foot walk, their fox trot, and their rocking horse canter.  


____________________________________________________________
UPDATES:
Coming foals:
  One 2012 foal due in October
  Two foals due in spring of 2013 
 
 New sire ...exceptional pedigree and performer

One of A Kind aka "Fella"...please see  him on the stallion page



805-237-0914   or email mpfoxtrotters@gmail.com
____________________________________________________________



Located in Templeton California near Carriage Vineyards and Pomar Junction Winery











____________________________________________________________
Ranch Membership

Five levels of Membership ~ coming this summer

 


Now offering basic riding classes

Must pass basic riding classes before becoming a member.
Three -eight classes for certificate depending on skill level at start. $30/class. Some riders may waive requirement with interview and practical.
Thank you for your interest!



Please don't hesitate to call and ask questions
 


805-237-0914








Miss Myra  and Miss Brandy Supreme are waiting for you to begin your test ride!







---------------------------------------------------------------------
*****************************************************
*****************************************************
---------------------------------------------------------------------


THE BELOW ARTICLES ARE BY GAITED AUTHOR LEE ZIEGLER ...At Mp Foxtrotters we are breeding for the older style of fox trot and with our new stallion "Fella" we hope to achieve that goal.


Some of Lee's articles are reproduced here:

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]

[]



http://gaited-horse.blogspot.com/2008/06/lee-ziegler-stepping-pace-description.html
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
LINKS: http://hay-net.co.uk/
******************************************************Seven

TIPS

Tips for Missouri Fox Trotter Versatility Success MFTHBA versatility competitors share some strategies that have helped them improve their performance.

By Lisa Munniksma


With the rising popularity of the Missouri Fox Trotting Horse Breed Association (MFTHBA) Versatility Program, many riders are seeking out ways to improve their performance. With 19 events to choose from, including gymkhana, speed events, jumping and more, there’s a lot to work on. Here, three MFTHBA versatility competitors share some strategies that have helped them with these seven tips: 1. Study the rule book. MFTHBA Trainers Committee Board of Directors representative Gabby Moore, DVM, says the rules are similar to those of other breeds, but there are some differences. 2. Choose a horse based on disposition. “The most important part is horse selection,” says MFTHBA Versatility Judges Committee member Merle Arbo. “If you don’t have a willing partner for versatility classes, it’s not going to happen.” 3. Start small and build from there. “Pick your classes. Don’t just enter everything. Pick two or three classes you want to excel in, and when you get those down, add a class,” says Arbo. There is a lot of excitement surrounding the versatility program, and it’s easy to take on too much and overwhelm a horse. 4. Practice makes perfect. “The more you work with your horse before the horse show, the better you’re going to do at the horse show,” says Arbo. When it comes to the slow precision work, a lot of people would rather just skip it, but acing the sidepass, turn on the haunches, and overall control of the horse’s body takes hard work. 5. Get the gaits down first. “You need to have a pure foxtrot and a pure flat-footed walk,” says Dr. Moore. MFTHBA Versatility Committee chair Julie Moore agrees: “The No. 1 concern of those of us in the MFTHBA organization is maintaining the wonderful, smooth gaits of our Missouri Fox Trotting Horses. Therefore, the first step in any of our training programs is to develop the correct execution and rhythm in our horses’ gaits.” 6. Long trotting is not a bad thing. Julie Moore says she does a lot of long trotting with her Missouri Fox Trotters, even though some people would say not to long trot a gaited horse. “The long trot is the only gait at which the horse will truly develop the muscles along his topline—the muscles along the back—evenly on both sides. Also, in a long trot the horse learns balance and the proper use of his shoulders and hindquarters to develop a nice long stride,” she says. 7. Work on suppling and flexing, too. “You want a nice, fluid, supple, collected horse, just like in any other discipline,” says Dr. Moore. “However, trainers must guard against asking the Fox Trotting horse to back off the bit and round their frame too much as it will adversely affect their gaits,” Julie Moore cautions. Once these seven steps are practiced well, Missouri Fox Trotters headed for the versatility arena can begin more specialized training in areas of interest, such as ranch cutting, pleasure driving, and hunter over fences.


Website provided by  Vistaprint
Website
provided by Vistaprint
MapQuest Terms and Conditions Maps/Directions are informational only. User assumes all risk of use. MapQuest, Vistaprint, and their suppliers make no representations or warranties about content, road conditions, route usability, or speed.